Awareness brings change

This week I’m exploring the needs for awareness, as an encouragement to all those I know who are fighting hard to keep raising awareness. I wrote about how different it looks from the outside, and that lead to the first reason it’s so important to raise awareness – because if we don’t tell people, they don’t know. Today is my second reason:

Reason 2: Because awareness brings change

As I discussed yesterday, when people don’t understand an illness, they make wrong assumptions – and the knowledge and assumptions we have are the basis for our actions.

Currently the assumptions that people have about ME, mostly formed from the negative portrayals in the media and their own preference for assuming the best, lead to a negative treatment and response of those suffering. They hear or assume fakery, false illness beliefs and over-emphasising, so they act as though sufferers aren’t really ill, aren’t as bad as they say they are, or that they would improve if they just thought positively.

It’s even worse when these lies and false assumptions affect the medical profession. Since they aren’t taught about the disease, they have no idea how to treat it – worse, with no accurate foundation, they are susceptible to listening to the serious miscarriages of science in the psychosomatic school of ME ‘research’. Someone with even a basic knowledge could not take such things seriously, but because they haven’t even that much, patients are treated like malingerers. Worse, many are imprisoned in psychiatric institutions, forced to exercise against their will and better judgement, ultimately making them irreperably worse.

But think of the opposite – what happens when doctors are adequately informed of how to treat the disease? Patients improve, they can manage their lifestyles. Or think about other illnesses which have previously been little-known: when enough people know about the difficulties, the much-needed research finally gets funded and there are breakthroughs in treatment. Even in the day-to-day, the way a patient is treated by someone with understanding restores dignity to a horrific situation, instead of degrading them further and adding insult to the grave injury of underserved and unremmiting disease.

Informing people is part of how we make that change. When the balance tips and people’s preconceptions are based on truth, that knowledge will bring change.

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